Goats in Philippines


(Philippines)

Goats are becoming ever popular in the Philippines, with people raising them on farms, backyards and ranches. Goat raising started in the 1970’s and demand has been growing ever since. In general supply is unable to meet demand and many are investing in breeding stock from within and outside the Philippines. In the well know goat book from Mackenzie he wrote "As a milk producer, the goat is inevitably more efficient where the available fodder is of such low quality that a cow can barely live," and in another longer lived quote
"Indeed, I find among the writers, that the milk of the goat is next in estimation to a woman; for it helpeth the stomach, removeth oppilations and stoppings of the liver and looseth the belly," wrote William Harrison echoing the opinion of 2,000 years of medical writing. It is a fact that even Hippocrates commended the virtues of goats' milk, and even the great Homer is quoted as saying “some of the gods and goddesses themselves were reared on it.” There are at least 12 goat species however only a relatively small number of breeds are used economically

The Philippine or common goat is a tough but small animal weighing around 25 kilograms when mature. The average daily milk production is approximately 350 grams, with a butterfat content of around 4.6 percent. The color range is either red or black or a combination and these goat types are widespread throughout Asia.

The Dadiangas goat is common in the city of Dadiangas (which is now called General Santos City), South Cotabato. The breed is a mixture of native, Nubian and Jamnapari goats and some animals may even have some Alpine or Saanen blood. The milk production and butterfat content are marginally higher than native goats and they do best in the dryer areas of the Philippines.

Of the other breeds Anglo Nubian performs the best along with the newer introduced Boer goats. The dairy breeds such as the Sanaan, Toggenburg and French Alpine perform relatively poorly.

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Nov 07, 2011
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Wanted: Pure Dadiangas or Jamnapari Goats
by: Anonymous

I would like to acquire Pure breed Dadiangas goats, Jamnapari breed, Etawa Goats or KIKO goats

Please e mail Price , Picture, loacation and age to : hapypirate@yahoo.com.

Thanks

Mar 30, 2009
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NATIVE GOATS HAVE MILK TOO.
by: Pio M. Sian, M.D

I always believed that a well-fed and well cared goat will be almost as productive as a pure bred specimen. We have a native goat in Bacolod that had
produced 750-800 grams per day from a dam barely 20 Kgs herself. This was for the 45 day period. We decided to stop so we can breed her again. There were a few simple rules I required of the help, and
also for those who wanted to learn.
1. Keep that billy at least 500 meters away! It is just a nuisance and he makes kids, nannies and even humans stink. Non-breeding males are best castrated.
They don't smell, grows fast and meaty and docile. Keep the best male for breeding. The will only see the females for the dates.
2. Have the kids suckle for 10-14 days and you can have all the milk you need. Milk at the same time daily. Treat your milker as you would your rooster. Rough handling will give you less milk.
3. Grain supplement half kilo for half kilo of milk. My formula is simple : 2 Kg ground corn
1 Kg peanuts Roasted and ground up, 1 kg grated coconut, Half kg of molasses, 1 tsp salt and 100
grams pulverized eggshells or oyster shell. Mix it good and give supplement commensurate to the output. Gram for gram. Of course, she still gets free range. Legume fodder is best Mongo, sitao,
peanut hay or ipil-ipil or whatever. Jatropha is a NO-NO!!!
4. A milk stand is very helpful. Utmost sanitation
is critical. A simple Pasteurization can be learned easily. One does not need thermometer at 165deeg F. etc. Just strain the raw milk, put in a double boiler stir constantly touch the spoon occasionally when hot to touch, count to 20 then put the milk jug in ice water. It's done. It will keep 10 days in the ref. I don't mind disseminating the info if you find it helpful.
Thanks.
Doc Sian

Sep 10, 2008
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goatsd and all
by: tony san

I would like a goat that could survive our climate here in the highlands of benguet where the average temperature is 18 degrees centigrade and the rainy season lasts for 5 months or more.


Dec 08, 2007
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damn damn baby
by: Lizzie

i want to have a pure bred boer but the prize is not that affordable for me i wish i could have one for a pet in my wide backyard

Dec 08, 2007
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damn damn baby
by: Lizzie

i want to have a pure bred boer but the prize is not that affordable for me i wish i could have one for a pet in my wide backyard

Dec 08, 2007
Rating
starstarstarstarstar
damn damn baby
by: Lizzie

i want to have a pure bred boer but the prize is not that affordable for me i wish i could have one for a pet in my wide backyard

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